Employee Engagement – Still talking about the same thing, right?

 

An obscure “Blade of Glory” quote popularised recently by Jay-Z and Kanye But while Chazz Michael Michaels was talking about “lady humps” the same conversation might just make sense in the context of employee engagement.

As a concept, engagement has its roots in the work of Iban Mayo and the human relations movement. Contrary to the prevailing scientific management wisdom at the time, Mayo stumbled upon the somewhat obvious fact that merely treating employees like humans (with a gesture as small as adjusting the lighting in the workplace) can have a significant impact on productivity.

The concept has evolved over time, with notable input from survey based interventions and organisations like Gallup. But while the numerical focus has undoubtedly helped the idea to mature and guided organisations toward specific interventions, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that the real meaning of engagement has got lost in its practical application. Just about every employee will recognise the phrase, but try asking for a definition and see what you get. Provocative? Gets the people going?

Most research into the topic comes to the firm conclusion that the biggest driver of “engagement” is employees finding meaning in their work. This can be traced through:

  • Organisations having a greater purpose and vision,
  • Employees connecting with this purpose,
  • Understanding how their personal job contributes to this larger purpose
  • And having the tools, resource and mandate to complete their job effectively.

This is all very sensible. The difficulty when it comes to practice, however, is that organisations tend to focus on “quick wins” and easily measurable improvement plans – because we all know “what gets measured, gets managed”.

Many organisations focus on the bottom two points, with the result that to many, employee engagement has become a confusing mish-mash of making sure everyone has a pen, letting people wear jeans on a Friday and holding strictly scheduled briefings, where a corporate powerpoint presentation is recited to uninterested employees.

So what would focusing on a purpose and an individual employee’s relationship with that purpose look like? Here are three thoughts:

Define the organisations larger purpose (beyond enriching shareholders)

There are plenty of good examples, including Unilever, Melotte and Puma. Wal-Mart, suffering some particularly bad press in 2005, made an extra effort in its response to Hurricane Katrina. In the process, CEO Lee Scott noticed a massive increase in employee engagement. Attributing the increased engagement to a sense of purpose, and deciding he wanted a work force as enthusiastic as that all the time, he decided to do some thinking around Wal-Mart’s larger purpose. Scott set a target in 2005 to produce zero waste, have an energy supply that is 100% renewable and only produce products that sustain our environment and resources. This has been Wal-Mart’s sustainability mantra ever since.

Give employees the opportunity to create their own meaning around that purpose – and encourage two way dialogue

To make their sustainability mantra meaningful for their 1.3 million employees, Wal-Mart created a tool called My Sustainability Plan. This allowed employees to take the concept of sustainability and create meaning for the idea that was relevant for them. Regarding two way dialogue, Brighter Planet have produced research suggesting organisations where employees are able to make suggestions are six times as likely to have a very effective engagement programme.

Enable all employees to contribute to the larger purpose – and not just in a token way

Beyond personal sustainability plans, Wal-mart have used their Sustainability goals to re-invigorate their lean six sigma thinking. Engaging entire teams in sessions to re-design packaging and reduce waste has led to dozens of implemented ideas and millions of dollars saved.

Organisations looking for that magic bullet of discretionary effort, productivity and on-fire-employees would do well to look at their role in society and how their employees are able to engage with that. I don’t know about you, but more than having pens, or dress down Friday, I find that provocative. It gets me going.